Lodge popular lowest 12 Inch Cast Iron Lid. Classic 12-Inch Cast Iron Cover Lid with Handle and Interior Basting Tips. online

Lodge popular lowest 12 Inch Cast Iron Lid. Classic 12-Inch Cast Iron Cover Lid with Handle and Interior Basting Tips. online

Lodge popular lowest 12 Inch Cast Iron Lid. Classic 12-Inch Cast Iron Cover Lid with Handle and Interior Basting Tips. online
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Product Description

Lodge 12 Inch Cast Iron Lid. Classic 12-Inch Cast Iron Cover Lid with Handle and Interior Basting Tips.

Amazon.com

This 12-inch cast-iron lid comes pre-seasoned (coated with Logics own vegetable oil formula and baked in hot industrial ovens) and ready to use; hence, the Logic in the name. Compatible with the 12-inch Lodge skillet, the lid even has two side flanges to cover the skillets pouring lips. Excellent at keeping in heat, steam, and splatters, the heavy lid will also fit the 5-quart chicken fryer and the 7-quart Dutch oven. Lodges legendary cast-iron cookware will last for generations. --Ann Bieri

Product information 12 Inch

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Q: 25 dollar cover for a 19 dollar pan? do they think we are stupid or something?

A: When warranted, I''m as critical of Amazon as the next gal, but I don''t share the Amazon-en…

East Coast Refugee | 2 years ago

Q: I have a 5 quart wagner 1891 dutch oven with glass lid. i want to bake bread so need a ca…

A: Can''t say 100% but the "inside" lip diameter of the Lodge L8IC3 Cast Iron Lid is 9-7/8" an…

Gump48 | 6 years ago

Q: I dont have a lodge pan ..instead a vintage cast iron pan ... its stamped on the bottom #1…

A: The "ridge" that is on the bottom of the lid is from outside to outside 11 5/8 . The ridg…

AZJake Top Contributor: Cooking
7 years ago

Q: where it made?

A: The lid is exactly like the picture and has the Lodge logo on the top, and 10 and 1/4" …

P. Cicarelli | 8 years ago

Customer reviews

4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
4,473 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Daisy STop Contributor: Cooking
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fits my Lodge 12 inch Skillet perfectly. Detailed review.
Reviewed in the United States on February 4, 2017
Size: 12 Inch
Well I had owned my Lodge Cast Iron Skillet for about 1.5 years now. It needed a lid for the 12 inch so I was delighted to discover this one on Amazon. These are the reasons that I love my Lodge Cast Iron 12 inch Lid: 1 When I cover my 12 inch skillet,... See more
Well I had owned my Lodge Cast Iron Skillet for about 1.5 years now. It needed a lid for the 12 inch so I was delighted to discover this one on Amazon.

These are the reasons that I love my Lodge Cast Iron 12 inch Lid:

1 When I cover my 12 inch skillet, I cwn place my pan with cover into my oven...even at say 450 or higher degrees. I usually bake at 350 degrees using my cast iron in the oven, however.

2 Self Basting Lid...this lid has spikes inside it. The spikes and the lid itself baste the food on top of the stove or in the oven, this creates a tender and juicy meat every time!

3 The Lid has a tight fit and keeps the heat in the pan. When I sear meat, I place this lid on top of pan and it helps to tenderize the meat and makes the meat juicer, even more flavorful.

4 Biggest reason that I love this lid is that it does a better job with my food than my 12 inch vented Tempured Glass lid. The food tastes better, juicer and more tender than a glass lid in my opinion.
*** I prefer to use this lid over my glass lid because I can safely bake in the oven with it even at high temps.***

5 The lid is a bit heavy but I like this. Even when it is on my 12 inch skillet and I remove from the oven, I just hold the skillet front handle and other top handle.

Highly recommend this lid for the 12 inch skillet.
82 people found this helpful
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Jay from Baltimore
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Frying pan lid or deadly frisbee ? You decide.
Reviewed in the United States on September 2, 2017
Size: 10.25 Inch
It perfectly fits the Lodge cast iron pan. Enough said. This is heavy cast iron. Like hefting a manhole cover. melt it into a cannonball when you''re done with it. If this ever became a projectile then God help anyone who was in it''s way.
69 people found this helpful
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Teacher_Mommy_on_Wheels
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Heavy. TLC required. Versatile. Multi-generational. Reasonably priced. Lodge seasoned CI made in USA
Reviewed in the United States on May 11, 2021
Size: 10.25 Inch
This is a Lodge lid for a 10.25 inch CI pot, but even the lid requires the same treatment and care that any CI cookware item requires (I offer details on the care and use of CI cookware below). For a lid, it is VERY heavy; it requires LOTS of TLC (see below); it... See more
This is a Lodge lid for a 10.25 inch CI pot, but even the lid requires the same treatment and care that any CI cookware item requires (I offer details on the care and use of CI cookware below).

For a lid, it is VERY heavy; it requires LOTS of TLC (see below); it is versatile only as far as it can be used for other CI pots of a similar size; it is reasonably priced, for CI, but overpriced for a mere lid, especially as any glass or steel lid that fits may be used (a CI lid is not a requirement) with your CI skillet, unless you are compulsive as I am and can never tolerate to mix and match; in that case, your CI skillet will require the too pricey CI lid).

Before I delve into the review of this LCI (well, of CI in general, but bear in mind that all the below notes apply to the lid here being reviewed), let me just warn my readers that CI is rather heavy! If you have arthritis or a weak arm and had, you may want to consider a lighter-weight cookware.

Now on to the “meat” (pun intended) portions of this review…

Cast iron is a forgiving but high maintenance mistress! She will forgive almost anything (even allowing her to rust!!!), but she does require a little TLC before, during, and after each use. The TLC she needs is:

1. Before using: season CI
1) Cast iron must be seasoned before any use; luckily, Lodge double seasons its cast iron so that customers may use the product right out of the box, but if you need to re-season the cast iron product, follow these steps:
i) Scrub CI well in hot soapy water.
ii) Dry thoroughly.
iii) Spread a thin layer of oil (I like avocado oil, but vegetable or canola will suffice) over the CI (interior, exterior, handle, all parts).
iv) Place CI upside down on a middle oven rack and turn on the oven and allow to heat to 550°. (PLEASE refrain from placing the CI into an already heated oven; the CI heat gradually in the oven as the oven works its way up to 550 degrees F)
(1) ***NOTE: temperature depends on the oil being used to season (AO has a high smoking point, but VO and CO have lower smoking points; this means that if you are using VO or CO, you need to set the oven to 400 degrees instead of 550).
v) Place foil on a lower rack to catch drips.
vi) Once the oven temperature reaches 550 degrees, “bake” the CI for 50-90 minutes.
vii) Turn off the oven and allow the CI to cool inside the oven.
***Reminder: temperature depends on the oil being used to season (AO has a high smoking point, but VO and CO have lower smoking points; this means that if you are using VO or CO, you need to set the oven to 400 degrees instead of 550).
2. During usage: use a “fatty food” the first time you use the CI implement.
a. Personally, I love any excuse to fry bacon, so I always “break-in” my CI with bacon slices; however, there are many amongst you who are unable to partake in bacon for religious, moral and ethical, or environmental reasons. For those amongst you who cannot use bacon, cook a food that requires deep frying.
b. Pre-heat the CI before using (every single time) or your food will stick and crumble
i. NOTE: Although I ALWAYS pre-heat my CI for cooking, I rarely do so for cake-baking; for cake-baking I used a very liberal amount of my home-made pan release “goo” to fully coat the pan, and I pour the cake batter right into the pan; works every time!
3. After using: wash and re-season (NO, not the detailed steps mentioned above)
a. After using the CI, and while it is still hot, wash using scorching (wear heat resistant gloves as to not burn your hands) water and salt (refrain from using chemical cleaners)
i. NEVER wash in a dishwasher (OMG)
b. Dry completely and thoroughly
c. Spread a thin layer of oil over the CI (interior, exterior, handle, all parts) and place the CI on the stove top to heat for about 10 minutes
d. Store CI in a moisture free environment
i. NEVER store food in CI
ii. NEVER store CI in fridge or freezer

So that is the TLC required for a CI pan or pot, but there are still several things to keep in mind:

A. NOT everything should be cooked in cast iron!
(1) Avoid cooking acidic foods in CI (yes, it is okay to finish the dish with a small squeeze of lemon (not when skillet is hot) or a few drops of vinegar, it is okay to add tomatoes and tomato paste to the dish you are cooking, but it is NEVER okay to stew tomato prolonged periods, deglaze with vinegar, or lemon juice to foods while they were still hot on the skillet)
(2) Avoid (at least in the beginning when your cast iron is still getting TLC) sticky foods (fried eggs, omelets, pancakes, scrambled eggs, fried rice, crepes, etc.) as they will definitely stick to your CI; this is not to say that you will not eventually be able to fry eggs or make crepes on your CI, I do all the time, but you will need to have reused and reasoned you CI many times before it becomes fully non-stick.
(3) Avoid cooking delicate fish (flounder, tilapia, etc.) In CI because the delicate fish will not tolerate the heat retained by the CI (an asset when searing steak) and will fall apart when flipped.
(4) Avoid (particularly before your CI becomes super well-seasoned) using the same pan for savory and sweet as the CI does retain flavors; in other words, using the CI to bake a vanilla cake immediately the day after using it to make garlic chicken may make your vanilla a tad too garlicky!
(5) Avoid using CI to cook foods that require lengthy periods of simmering, boiling, or steaming as the lengthy simmering, boiling, or steaming will strip your CI of its hard-earned seasoning.

Are you still reading? If after reading the previous portions of this review, you are concerned about the TLC necessary to maintain CI, then I really recommend you consider other cookware options. (Caphlan non-stick is a viable alternative); if on the other hand, you are still reading, then you are not dissuaded from investing in CI cookware, and I am glad of that!

There are numerous benefits to cooking and baking in CI:
1) Cast iron is extremely sturdy and is very difficult to ruin. (If you do ruin a CI pan, you can restore and reclaim it!).
2) Cast iron heats up evenly and retains heat incredibly well, which makes CI excellent for searing meat, baking corn bread, making pies, baking crusty bread, etc., and for keeping food warm as you serve it!
3) Cast iron is healthy; yes, that is true! During the cooking process a trace amount of iron is absorbed into the foods, and when the foods are consumed by you, you are getting some iron into your system (a healthy by-product of CI cooking).
4) Cast iron is quite versatile. You may use CI for almost everything (you make slow cook a lamb leg to perfect or make a three-layer birthday cake for your daughter in CI). Additionally, CI goes from cupboard, to stove-top, to oven, to camp-fire, and to dinner table! Talk about versatility!
5) Cast iron is of heirloom status; it lasts for generations! I personally have a huge collection, and I plan to bequest my CI to my daughter (it shall be written in my will-not kidding).

So, to re-cap:
CI is a rather heavy type of cookware that offers great versatility, heats evenly, retains heat well, requires pre-seasoning and re-seasoning, and is multi-generational. And, of course, Lodge is an excellent CI brand. Lodge was founded in 1896 and is one of the very few remaining companies that still produce seasoned CI in the US (in the Lodge foundries in Tennessee). Lodge products are sturdy, versatile, heirloom-quality, and of course reasonably priced (as compared to the more expensive companies).

I have been using CI (especially Lodge) for two and one-half decades (yes, ¼ of a century) now, and I will NEVER use anything else! A purchase of Lodge CI cookware and bakeware is a very sound investment indeed!

**If you found this review of use, please “like” using the thumbs-up button below. Thank you.
**If you would like to read more of my reviews (when I post reviews), please select “follow” button below. Thank you.
17 people found this helpful
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Teacher_Mommy_on_Wheels
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Heavy. TLC required. Versatile. Multi-generational. Reasonably priced. Lodge seasoned CI made in USA
Reviewed in the United States on May 11, 2021
Size: 12 Inch
This is a Lodge lid for a 12 inch CI pot, but even the lid requires the same treatment and care that any CI cookware item requires (I offer details on the care and use of CI cookware below). For a lid, it is VERY heavy; it requires LOTS of TLC (see below); it is... See more
This is a Lodge lid for a 12 inch CI pot, but even the lid requires the same treatment and care that any CI cookware item requires (I offer details on the care and use of CI cookware below).

For a lid, it is VERY heavy; it requires LOTS of TLC (see below); it is versatile only as far as it can be used for other CI pots of a similar size; it is reasonably priced, for CI, but overpriced for a mere lid, especially as any glass or steel lid that fits may be used (a CI lid is not a requirement) with your CI skillet, unless you are compulsive as I am and can never tolerate to mix and match; in that case, your CI skillet will require the too pricey CI lid).

Before I delve into the review of this LCI (well, of CI in general, but bear in mind that all the below notes apply to the lid here being reviewed), let me just warn my readers that CI is rather heavy! If you have arthritis or a weak arm and had, you may want to consider a lighter-weight cookware.

Now on to the “meat” (pun intended) portions of this review…

Cast iron is a forgiving but high maintenance mistress! She will forgive almost anything (even allowing her to rust!!!), but she does require a little TLC before, during, and after each use. The TLC she needs is:

1. Before using: season CI
1) Cast iron must be seasoned before any use; luckily, Lodge double seasons its cast iron so that customers may use the product right out of the box, but if you need to re-season the cast iron product, follow these steps:
i) Scrub CI well in hot soapy water.
ii) Dry thoroughly.
iii) Spread a thin layer of oil (I like avocado oil, but vegetable or canola will suffice) over the CI (interior, exterior, handle, all parts).
iv) Place CI upside down on a middle oven rack and turn on the oven and allow to heat to 550°. (PLEASE refrain from placing the CI into an already heated oven; the CI heat gradually in the oven as the oven works its way up to 550 degrees F)
(1) ***NOTE: temperature depends on the oil being used to season (AO has a high smoking point, but VO and CO have lower smoking points; this means that if you are using VO or CO, you need to set the oven to 400 degrees instead of 550).
v) Place foil on a lower rack to catch drips.
vi) Once the oven temperature reaches 550 degrees, “bake” the CI for 50-90 minutes.
vii) Turn off the oven and allow the CI to cool inside the oven.
***Reminder: temperature depends on the oil being used to season (AO has a high smoking point, but VO and CO have lower smoking points; this means that if you are using VO or CO, you need to set the oven to 400 degrees instead of 550).
2. During usage: use a “fatty food” the first time you use the CI implement.
a. Personally, I love any excuse to fry bacon, so I always “break-in” my CI with bacon slices; however, there are many amongst you who are unable to partake in bacon for religious, moral and ethical, or environmental reasons. For those amongst you who cannot use bacon, cook a food that requires deep frying.
b. Pre-heat the CI before using (every single time) or your food will stick and crumble
i. NOTE: Although I ALWAYS pre-heat my CI for cooking, I rarely do so for cake-baking; for cake-baking I used a very liberal amount of my home-made pan release “goo” to fully coat the pan, and I pour the cake batter right into the pan; works every time!
3. After using: wash and re-season (NO, not the detailed steps mentioned above)
a. After using the CI, and while it is still hot, wash using scorching (wear heat resistant gloves as to not burn your hands) water and salt (refrain from using chemical cleaners)
i. NEVER wash in a dishwasher (OMG)
b. Dry completely and thoroughly
c. Spread a thin layer of oil over the CI (interior, exterior, handle, all parts) and place the CI on the stove top to heat for about 10 minutes
d. Store CI in a moisture free environment
i. NEVER store food in CI
ii. NEVER store CI in fridge or freezer

So that is the TLC required for a CI pan or pot, but there are still several things to keep in mind:

A. NOT everything should be cooked in cast iron!
(1) Avoid cooking acidic foods in CI (yes, it is okay to finish the dish with a small squeeze of lemon (not when skillet is hot) or a few drops of vinegar, it is okay to add tomatoes and tomato paste to the dish you are cooking, but it is NEVER okay to stew tomato prolonged periods, deglaze with vinegar, or lemon juice to foods while they were still hot on the skillet)
(2) Avoid (at least in the beginning when your cast iron is still getting TLC) sticky foods (fried eggs, omelets, pancakes, scrambled eggs, fried rice, crepes, etc.) as they will definitely stick to your CI; this is not to say that you will not eventually be able to fry eggs or make crepes on your CI, I do all the time, but you will need to have reused and reasoned you CI many times before it becomes fully non-stick.
(3) Avoid cooking delicate fish (flounder, tilapia, etc.) In CI because the delicate fish will not tolerate the heat retained by the CI (an asset when searing steak) and will fall apart when flipped.
(4) Avoid (particularly before your CI becomes super well-seasoned) using the same pan for savory and sweet as the CI does retain flavors; in other words, using the CI to bake a vanilla cake immediately the day after using it to make garlic chicken may make your vanilla a tad too garlicky!
(5) Avoid using CI to cook foods that require lengthy periods of simmering, boiling, or steaming as the lengthy simmering, boiling, or steaming will strip your CI of its hard-earned seasoning.

Are you still reading? If after reading the previous portions of this review, you are concerned about the TLC necessary to maintain CI, then I really recommend you consider other cookware options. (Caphlan non-stick is a viable alternative); if on the other hand, you are still reading, then you are not dissuaded from investing in CI cookware, and I am glad of that!

There are numerous benefits to cooking and baking in CI:
1) Cast iron is extremely sturdy and is very difficult to ruin. (If you do ruin a CI pan, you can restore and reclaim it!).
2) Cast iron heats up evenly and retains heat incredibly well, which makes CI excellent for searing meat, baking corn bread, making pies, baking crusty bread, etc., and for keeping food warm as you serve it!
3) Cast iron is healthy; yes, that is true! During the cooking process a trace amount of iron is absorbed into the foods, and when the foods are consumed by you, you are getting some iron into your system (a healthy by-product of CI cooking).
4) Cast iron is quite versatile. You may use CI for almost everything (you make slow cook a lamb leg to perfect or make a three-layer birthday cake for your daughter in CI). Additionally, CI goes from cupboard, to stove-top, to oven, to camp-fire, and to dinner table! Talk about versatility!
5) Cast iron is of heirloom status; it lasts for generations! I personally have a huge collection, and I plan to bequest my CI to my daughter (it shall be written in my will-not kidding).

So, to re-cap:
CI is a rather heavy type of cookware that offers great versatility, heats evenly, retains heat well, requires pre-seasoning and re-seasoning, and is multi-generational. And, of course, Lodge is an excellent CI brand. Lodge was founded in 1896 and is one of the very few remaining companies that still produce seasoned CI in the US (in the Lodge foundries in Tennessee). Lodge products are sturdy, versatile, heirloom-quality, and of course reasonably priced (as compared to the more expensive companies).

I have been using CI (especially Lodge) for two and one-half decades (yes, ¼ of a century) now, and I will NEVER use anything else! A purchase of Lodge CI cookware and bakeware is a very sound investment indeed!

**If you found this review of use, please “like” using the thumbs-up button below. Thank you.
**If you would like to read more of my reviews (when I post reviews), please select “follow” button below. Thank you.
9 people found this helpful
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Brian Smith
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Doesn''t Fit Older #10 Skillet
Reviewed in the United States on October 27, 2020
Size: 12 Inch
I don''t know if Lodge is making smaller skillets than they used to, but I have an older skillet size 10 and it is _exactly_ 12 inches inside, edge-to-edge (see photo). This 12-inch Lodge lid doesn''t fit. It''s slightly smaller and the flange underneath doesn''t actually rest... See more
I don''t know if Lodge is making smaller skillets than they used to, but I have an older skillet size 10 and it is _exactly_ 12 inches inside, edge-to-edge (see photo). This 12-inch Lodge lid doesn''t fit. It''s slightly smaller and the flange underneath doesn''t actually rest against the side walls of the skillet as it should, so it slides pretty freely from side to side, doesn''t seal, and will not sit level if you put any weight on an edge--it "scoops" down into the skillet and levers the opposite rim up. It''s not a stable fit at all. It''s a little hard to see in the photos; it doesn''t look like much, but it''s actually a more significant gap than it appears in the photos.

I''m not sure why this is labeled a 12-inch lid. There is no dimension on it that measures 12 inches. Flange to flange is about half-an-inch less, and outside edge-to-edge is more. There''s nothing in particular about this lid that is 12 anything.
10 people found this helpful
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Robert A. Grossman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you''re a cast iron purist then the decision is an easy one.
Reviewed in the United States on October 1, 2014
Size: 12 Inch
So, you''re considering buying a 12" cover for your Lodge pan or dutch oven. At the time of this writing the Lodge L10SK3 Pre-Seasoned Skillet, 12-Inch was selling at Amazon a little over $33. The cost for this cover is currently around $31. Some may wonder... See more
So, you''re considering buying a 12" cover for your Lodge pan or dutch oven. At the time of this writing the Lodge L10SK3 Pre-Seasoned Skillet, 12-Inch was selling at Amazon a little over $33. The cost for this cover is currently around $31.

Some may wonder why anyone would spend as much, or even perhaps more, for a lid for their cast iron skillet as they did for the skillet themselves. If you bought the skillet a few years ago you likely paid less than the current price of the cover. However, if you''re into cooking and you''ve really come to know and love what cast iron cooking is all about then you''ll realize, from a purely financial standpoint that it''s more analogous to buying a house than a cooking utensil. What I mean is that this cookware, if properly cared for, will literally last you a lifetime. If you consider the cost in terms of amortization over even twenty years, and you couple that with the superior functionality of a cover such as this compared to your alternatives which are likely the Lodge GC12 Tempered Glass Lid, 12-inch it''s a bargain. Personally, I think you''re absolutely crazy buy a glass cover for a cast iron pan. The reasons people buy glass covers are the exact reasons that people should not buy cast iron cookware to begin with.

If you read the reviews for the glass covers, and the reviews are generally positive I might add, you''ll find a common appeal. That is, that they are dishwasher safe, they are relatively light, you can view the contents of what''s in your pan or pot and they provide a cover for their cookware. Furthermore, if you buy the Lodge brand of glass cover then you MAY get a decent fit on your Lodge pan but certainly not nearly as good of a fit as with this cover. For what it''s worth, the Lodge brand glass lid, that''s inferior to the cast iron is made China. All Lodge cast iron cookware is made in the U.S. I don''t mean to imply that being made in China is necessarily a bad thing but I have learned that a lot of people have issues with it. That is is made in China makes it even harder for me to fathom how it could sell for even half the price of this lid. It simply shows that people will pay the money for the Lodge name but again, if all those convenience issues are what''s important to you in cookware then why bother with any cast iron cookware to begin with? Your Lodge 12" skillet is going to take some of your precious time to maintain. It''s going to be heavy when you lift it and you''re going to have to wash it by hand immediately after cooking with it then make sure it''s towel dried exceptionally well and after all that you may need to season it again and leave it in a hot oven for an hour or more. Some people find this to be a chore. I take delight in it because I know I''m caring for a life long investment. I also enjoy honing my good knives. It''s really very similar. You know, it''s like some people will only hand wash their cars because they don''t want the cloths from the automatic car washes gradually damaging the clear coat and ultimately the paint finish on their car and those car washes will damage your paint over time.

But, if you''re into cooking and you''ve experienced the superior cooking aspects that can only come from good cast iron cookware you''re happy to do it. But would you put cheap tires or cheap anything on your Porsche? Don''t put a cheap lid on what may be the finest piece of cookware you''ll ever own.

If these are things (light weight, dishwasher safe, a see through lid, etc.) that are really important to you then I suggest you shouldn''t be buying cast iron cookware to begin with. Cast Iron is heavy. It is not dishwasher safe, if fact if you put it in the dishwasher it''s a given that it will be ruined immediately. If you don''t wash and dry it promptly and properly, you''ll start seeing rust soon too.

Like this cast iron cover, the glass cover also gets stellar reviews. I''m sure it''s a good cover. A Volkswagen is a good car but it''s not as good as a Porsche. The analogy is not that questionable.

There are many enhancements that can end up staying created to your residence and some can demonstrate to be a significantly greater financial commitment than some others. The Lodge self basting cast iron cover is IMHO and enhancement that''s worth every penny.

You can certainly buy other 12 " covers for your cookware but a real chef will tell you that not all covers are the same and some covers serve a greater purpose than just overing the pot to keep the heat in. This Cover Provides Self-basting Spikes On The Underside That Allow The Nutrition And Flavor In The Steam To Drip Back Onto Food. Also, many people won''t spend the money on this lid because "they only use the lid occasionally". I''ve found, now that I own it and see how useful it is that I almost always use it. Have you been cooking bacon in your cast iron pan without a lid? Try cooking it with this lid. One might think that the bacon won''t get crispy because it will steam. NOT SO. Not only does it prevent the grease from splattering but the bacon will crisp up as much or as little as I want it to. How about fried eggs? I used to always go for over easy or over medium. No more. Now, I always use the lid and my fried egg of choice is "basted". Hey, don''t knock it until you''ve tried it.

This is a better lid than the standard cover; not only for your pan but for your dutch oven as well. You may be tempted to buy the less expensive glass covered lid and justify it because it costs less and you can look at what''s in the pan but if you''re really into cooking the self basting feature of this type of lid is all you''ll need to be sold on it. For stovetop the glass cover will let you see inside. It is not as heavy and it has no flanges to cover the spouts so it will let more steam out. For oven use I would get the iron lid. Even though the glass lid is allegedly oven safe to 400 degrees F, it has a plastic handle. I would not want to test it. The beauty of cast iron is that you''ll never have to worry about such things. Since the iron is heavier it will have somewhat of a pressure cooker effect and hold more steam in than the glass lid could ever hope to. You really want the self-basting iron lid for baking tender roasts. The iron lid is the one you can use absolutely anywhere, stove, oven, indoors, camping.
64 people found this helpful
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W. Holmes
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The L6SC3 9 fits the 9" Mini WOK like it was made for it
Reviewed in the United States on March 31, 2018
Size: 9 Inch
The L6SC3 9 fits the 9" Mini WOK like it was made for it, now I can enjoy my WOK even more.
27 people found this helpful
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Thomas E. Mcalpine
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not the correct measurements in the specifications.
Reviewed in the United States on December 19, 2017
Size: 12 Inch
Be careful! The specifications say that the lid is 12.1 inches when in fact the lid was 14 inches. this lid fits a #12 skillet with an opening at the top of the pan being 14 inches. A 12 inch opening would be a #10 pan.
23 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Dennis
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
These lids are great and I''d totally recommend them over glass ones
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 4, 2015
These lids are great and I''d totally recommend them over glass ones. These cast iron lids not only look stylish, but they also lock in the moisture a treat! Self-basting tips on the inside also do a great job! However, I''m astonished at the price that these have gone up to...See more
These lids are great and I''d totally recommend them over glass ones. These cast iron lids not only look stylish, but they also lock in the moisture a treat! Self-basting tips on the inside also do a great job! However, I''m astonished at the price that these have gone up to on Amazon lately!! Thankfully I bought these lids when they were cheap, but the price they''re at at the moment is outrageous!! Something''s wrong when the cost of the lid is vastly greater than the skillet! These lids are totally recommended from me, but I''d discourage you from paying exorbitant prices for them!! :)
These lids are great and I''d totally recommend them over glass ones. These cast iron lids not only look stylish, but they also lock in the moisture a treat! Self-basting tips on the inside also do a great job!

However, I''m astonished at the price that these have gone up to on Amazon lately!! Thankfully I bought these lids when they were cheap, but the price they''re at at the moment is outrageous!! Something''s wrong when the cost of the lid is vastly greater than the skillet!

These lids are totally recommended from me, but I''d discourage you from paying exorbitant prices for them!! :)
3 people found this helpful
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Dennis
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
These lids are great and I''d totally recommend them over glass ones
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 4, 2015
These lids are great and I''d totally recommend them over glass ones. These cast iron lids not only look stylish, but they also lock in the moisture a treat! Self-basting tips on the inside also do a great job! However, I''m astonished at the price that these have gone up to...See more
These lids are great and I''d totally recommend them over glass ones. These cast iron lids not only look stylish, but they also lock in the moisture a treat! Self-basting tips on the inside also do a great job! However, I''m astonished at the price that these have gone up to on Amazon lately!! Thankfully I bought these lids when they were cheap, but the price they''re at at the moment is outrageous!! Something''s wrong when the cost of the lid is vastly greater than the skillet! These lids are totally recommended from me, but I''d discourage you from paying exorbitant prices for them!! :)
These lids are great and I''d totally recommend them over glass ones. These cast iron lids not only look stylish, but they also lock in the moisture a treat! Self-basting tips on the inside also do a great job!

However, I''m astonished at the price that these have gone up to on Amazon lately!! Thankfully I bought these lids when they were cheap, but the price they''re at at the moment is outrageous!! Something''s wrong when the cost of the lid is vastly greater than the skillet!

These lids are totally recommended from me, but I''d discourage you from paying exorbitant prices for them!! :)
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent fit
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 10, 2021
This is a great addition for my 12" skillet. Should have bought one sooner.
This is a great addition for my 12" skillet. Should have bought one sooner.
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Rockwood Joe
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fits nicely on Lodges 9" Mini Wok!
Reviewed in Canada on February 22, 2018
I wanted to turn my 9" Lodge Mini Wok into a dutch oven, and this lid does just that. It fits perfectly and is a drip top. It is ideal for doing side dishes in the oven (beans, potatoes, beets, etc.). I personally prefer the Mini Wok combo with the 9" lid over using...See more
I wanted to turn my 9" Lodge Mini Wok into a dutch oven, and this lid does just that. It fits perfectly and is a drip top. It is ideal for doing side dishes in the oven (beans, potatoes, beets, etc.). I personally prefer the Mini Wok combo with the 9" lid over using a frying pan. It is far more versatile. I can stir fry and brown dumplings or meat etc in the wok, add a soup or stew base, pop on the lid and leave it on the stove top to simmer or throw it into the oven to roast or whatever. There isn''t much you can''t do with the mini Wok and this lid for making a one or two person meal. The factory seasoning is a little light. I finally got my lid a nice dark colour after a few seasonings with flax seed oil. No need to strip off the factory finish, just keep on adding your own. If the lid wasn''t so expensive, than I would''ve given it a full five stars.
I wanted to turn my 9" Lodge Mini Wok into a dutch oven, and this lid does just that. It fits perfectly and is a drip top. It is ideal for doing side dishes in the oven (beans, potatoes, beets, etc.).

I personally prefer the Mini Wok combo with the 9" lid over using a frying pan. It is far more versatile. I can stir fry and brown dumplings or meat etc in the wok, add a soup or stew base, pop on the lid and leave it on the stove top to simmer or throw it into the oven to roast or whatever. There isn''t much you can''t do with the mini Wok and this lid for making a one or two person meal.

The factory seasoning is a little light. I finally got my lid a nice dark colour after a few seasonings with flax seed oil. No need to strip off the factory finish, just keep on adding your own.

If the lid wasn''t so expensive, than I would''ve given it a full five stars.
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Omar Martinez
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
buena calidad
Reviewed in Mexico on July 18, 2018
buena calidad de la tapa, igual que las ollas y sartenes, había comprado unas ollas y sartenes de 10.25 pulg de diámetro por separado y aunque fuera de la misma marca estaba algo dudoso de si embonaría. embonaron, masomenos. una de las ollas tenia un filo...See more
buena calidad de la tapa, igual que las ollas y sartenes, había comprado unas ollas y sartenes de 10.25 pulg de diámetro por separado y aunque fuera de la misma marca estaba algo dudoso de si embonaría. embonaron, masomenos. una de las ollas tenia un filo "masculino" y coincide con el mismo tipo de filo que tiene la tapa. algo que no sale en las fotos y me parece no menciona la descripción es que en la cara interna de la tapa tiene unos "picos" para hacer que la condensación descienda y no se acumule en la tapa (me imagino). excelente producto, lo recomiendo ampliamente
buena calidad de la tapa, igual que las ollas y sartenes, había comprado unas ollas y sartenes de 10.25 pulg de diámetro por separado y aunque fuera de la misma marca estaba algo dudoso de si embonaría. embonaron, masomenos. una de las ollas tenia un filo "masculino" y coincide con el mismo tipo de filo que tiene la tapa.
algo que no sale en las fotos y me parece no menciona la descripción es que en la cara interna de la tapa tiene unos "picos" para hacer que la condensación descienda y no se acumule en la tapa (me imagino).
excelente producto, lo recomiendo ampliamente
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